Eliminating Mattress Fumes

1. Talk with the manufacturer about the chemicals that are in the mattress and could be off gassing. Ask them to hold it in the warehouse for several weeks before delivering it to give the chemicals time to off-gas. And ask them for their recommendations about dealing with the fumes.

2. Take a ride with the mattress. This may seem like an incredibly silly idea, but this can make a huge impact on getting rid of the odors. Put the mattress in an open truck and take a ride with it. Having air blow through the mattress has proven to get rid of the smell quickly and permanently. You can also do this as you take delivery of the mattress.

3. If the mattress is already staring at you in your bedroom, try using a box fan in an open window (weather permitting). Turn the fan so that it pulls air from the inside of the room to the outside. Close the door to the rest of the house. Although this is a temporary solution, it might possibly help keep the air in the rest of the house tolerable.

4. Research the mattresses on the market to find out which ones use fewer chemicals. Since 2004 the Consumer Product Safety Commission has required that any mattress sold in the United States be able to withstand an open flame for 30 minutes. This sets the safety bar wonderfully high in an attempt to prevent us from dying from a fire in bed. However, make sure that you are aware of the chemicals being used to prevent that fire. So before you throw away the old mattress make sure you have all the information on the new one.

Some Tricks for Good Night Sleep

– Be proactive and deal with any stressors, then park them until further input’s required. Try to avoid replaying situations in your mind. Be disciplined and calm your ‘fight or flight’ approach to stress. Take regular breaks, eat healthily and schedule fresh air and exercise; adopt a positive approach to work/life balance and getting a good night’s sleep.

– Dedicate quality time to family, friends but also schedule ‘me time’ for things that are important, but which may not include others. Be more assertive and say ‘no’ sometimes to requests and demands. Be firm about how much time you’re prepared to compromise.

– Home-workers often have an office in the bedroom. Screen it off after work so that’s it’s not always in your line of sight. Change out of your work clothes, go for a walk and ensure your bedroom becomes a peaceful, relaxing place. Minimise clutter and excessive technology.

– Turn your phone and laptop off two hours before bed, so avoiding the temptation to check in ‘just once more’. Designate times for going online and use your time more efficiently. Turn your phone to silent and keep it away from the bed as it can affect the quality of your sleep.

– Avoid having meaningful, important or stressful conversations before bed. When you’re busy, preoccupied or over-tired they’re not productive and can constantly replay in your mind, hence disrupting your sleep. Agree to discuss serious matters at a better time and ensure that they actually do take place.

– Many people have work that requires either mental or physical effort, resulting in tiredness in one area but not the other. Find balance by committing to quizzes and crosswords, or walking, swimming, the gym, so that you’re fully exerted both physically and mentally.

– Wind down before bed with a relaxing bath or shower to wash away the days’ stresses. Read, enjoy a hot, milky drink, meditate, listen to relaxing music or practice some yoga, all ways to let your mind and body know that it’s preparing to go to bed and have a good night’s sleep.

Being committed to a positive bedtime routine is a great investment in supporting a good night’s sleep. Then you’re ready for each coming day, feeling refreshed and recharged.

Vitamin D Affects Thyroid Conditions

Vitamin D Production

Vitamin D is unique compared to other vitamins, because it is nearly impossible to get what you need from food. Instead, your body produces it naturally in the skin when you’re exposed to natural or artificial UVB light.

Once your body produces vitamin D or you take it as a supplement, it’s sent to the liver. The liver transforms vitamin D into 25(OH)D and sends it various areas of the body and activates it. Once activated, it is ready to perform its duties.

Autoimmune Conditions

Autoimmunity occurs when the immune system treats a person’s healthy tissues and cells as a threat. When this happens, their body produces an immune response and attacks. This response can cause damage, inflammation, and chronic pain in many parts of the body.

Vitamin D deficiencies may reduce the body’s ability to fight infection and may link to or cause autoimmune diseases such as Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis and Grave’s Disease.

Clinical Studies

Several 2014 studies presented at the annual meeting of the Thyroid Association are of special interest. Researchers from Nanjing, China evaluated 34 patients with Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis and 32 with Grave’s Disease against 52 healthy patients. Researchers measured many thyroid-related factors including vitamin D3.

Vitamin D is actually a group of compounds classified vitamin D1, D2, and D3. Vitamin D3 is the naturally occurring form of the vitamin, and the most biologically active.

Researchers found patients with autoimmune thyroid disease had significantly lower vitamin D3 levels than the healthy controls. Patients with high thyroid peroxidase antibodies the body produces in thyroid autoimmune disease also had lower vitamin D levels. This suggests vitamin D insufficiency could link to or cause autoimmune thyroid disease.

Brazilian researchers studied 54 Hashimoto’s patients, compared to 54 healthy controls. They also found vitamin D deficiency in 63.2{df16b7182c78c8f70188289622ab585a7d58308ba8caad9fd3b1d5fb4854c6af} of the patients. Those with low vitamin D levels also had higher thyroid-stimulating hormone levels and a larger thyroid.

Lack of Vitamin D

Normally, the skin produces sufficient vitamin D when exposed to adequate UV light. However, the risks of skin cancer or melanoma now mean many people use sunscreen and cover their bodies. We also spend more time indoors for work and entertainment.

Since more clinical tests show a link between vitamin D and thyroid function, many physicians now recommend vitamin D testing as part of thyroid evaluation and care. Nonetheless, functional practitioners and doctors following the medical model may treat you differently based on your results.

Medical Model vs Functional Model

The medical model recommends 400 International Units per day of vitamin D. They also define a sufficient serum 25(OH)D level as over 50 nmol/L as it “covers the needs of 97.5{df16b7182c78c8f70188289622ab585a7d58308ba8caad9fd3b1d5fb4854c6af} of the population”. The test used to measure vitamin D levels in the 25-hydroxy vitamin D blood test.

The medical model usually recommends supplementation to increase low vitamin D levels. However, the functional approach to care recognizes multiple reasons may cause low vitamin D levels. Consequently, recommending supplements before looking at overall health and other possible issues can be ineffective and counterproductive.

Supplements don’t always correct low vitamin D levels, because they do not address underlying problems. The vitamin D receptor in some autoimmune patients cannot activate due to variations in their DNA sequence. Consequently, they need higher than normal blood levels of vitamin D to avoid vitamin D insufficiency.

Vitamin D is fat soluble, and some patients with thyroid issues like Hashimoto’s thyroiditis have low stomach acid and poor fat absorption. Autoimmune conditions such as Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and Grave’s disease also make the immune system work overtime, which depletes the body’s stores of vitamin D. Therefore, addressing gut and digestive issues and modulating the immune system are of primary importance before considering vitamin D supplementation.

A highly qualified functional practitioner will look at your gut and digestive health and if they’re satisfied, they may order a 25-hydroxy vitamin D blood test for your vitamin D levels.

Your practitioner may recommend supplementation to reach between 60 and 80 nmol/L. This is still well below the 125 nmol/L threshold where a patient might experience adverse effects. After several months, they’ll retest. If their serum level rose to an acceptable level, the doctor will adjust vitamin D intake so serum levels stay between 50 and 60 nmol/L.

Info of Autism and Technology Education

When the Bureau of Labor Statistic estimated that more than half of all the jobs require some sort of technological skills, it emerged as a problem for people with autism spectrum disorder. Natalie feared that her students would be destined for either low-wage or menial positions, or worse still, get no jobs at all.

Natalie identified an opportunity in teaching through autism apps like “Math on the Farm” and “Make Sentences”. She started using project-based learning and technology to impart key technical skills and also foster abilities for analytical thinking, problem solving and independent living.

Natalie soon quit her job to develop a curriculum for teaching special needs children. She included the “Math on the Farm” and “Make Sentences” apps in the program. Initially it was focused only on autistic kids, but soon expanded to include special needs children and those with cognitive disabilities. The program has won acclaim from experts and special educators alike. It’s being extensively used in the Louisiana school district and in some other neighboring states.

Natalie’s program is just one of the ways by which organizations and individuals are working to lend autistic children a better scope to succeed later in life at the workplace with high-skill jobs. The efforts range from promoting technological education to companies broadening their outlook on how to hire neglected talent. These efforts help in dispelling the misconception that autistic children suffering from intellectual disabilities can’t be accommodated in a technological space.

The initiatives by people like Natalie address a genuine problem. The rate of unemployment for people with disabilities, according to US Labor Department, is almost twice compared to that of people without disabilities. For people with developmental and cognitive disabilities, like Down syndrome, chances of landing a job are much worse.

Most people want to get employed in a meaningful job. People with intellectual disabilities and autism spectrum disorder are no different. Notwithstanding the millions of dollars being spent on technical and educational programs to reach better outcomes for people with autism spectrum disorder, the needle hasn’t moved much.